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Episode 2- Question 2-

 

The whole idea of checksheet is getting replaced by tools and BPM. Checksheets in their original form are almost obsolete. Do you think it will be removed completely as a QC topic in education of quality or do you think it will continue in its original form or in a modified form? Please answer in your own words. 

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 Checksheet

 

It is used to systematically record and compile data from historical sources, or observations as they occur.  It can be used to collect data at the location where the data is actually generated, in real time.  The type of data can be quantitative or qualitative.  

Checksheet is one of the seven basic tools of Quality.

 

What it does ?

1. Create an, easy to comprehend data that come from a simple efficient process                           

2. With every entry , creates a clean picture of facts as opposed to opinions of each team member

3. Standardizes agreement on the definition of each condition or event.

 

How is it done?

This can be deemed as a 8-step process:

1. Agree on the definition of events or conditions that are being observed
      Eg:  If we seek root cause for Severity1 defects, then agreement to be made on “Severity1”.
2. Decide on who collects the data (decide the person who will be involved in this activity)
3. Note down the source of the data. Data could be from a sample or an entire population and it can be quantitative or qualitative.
4. Decide on the knowledge level required (for the person who is involved) to collect the data.
5. Decide on the frequency of the data collection (whether data needs to be collected on weekly, hourly, daily, monthly basis....)
6. Decide on the duration of the data collection (how long data should be collected so as to have a meaningful outcome)
7. Construct a check sheet that is simple to use, concise and complete.
8. Have consistency in accumulating the data throughout the collecting period.

 

How can a checksheet look like

A checksheet can normally have

o   Project Name, for which the data is collected

o   Person (name) who collects the data

o   Location in which the data is collected

o   Date on which the data is collected

o   Any significant identifiers , if applicable

o   A column portraying the event name

o   Net total for rows and columns

 

Let us take a sample checksheet for a hospital.

 

Project Name: In-Patient bottlenecks

Name: Rajesh R

Shift: Night

Location : Ward Room

Dates: 01-Sep-2017 to 03-Sep-2017

Reasons:

             Dates

Total

01-Sep

02-Sep

03-Sep

Patient’s Attire not taken care

1

1

1

3

Beds not available

1

1

1

3

 

Here ‘Shift’ is the key identifier and ‘Reason’ is the event.

 

Let us take a sample checksheet for a Mainframe batch

 

Project Name: Mainframe Op

Name: Rajesh R

Shift: Midnight

Location : Batch

Dates: 09-Apr-2017 to 11-Apr-2017

Reasons:

             Dates

Total

09-Apr

10-Apr

11-Apr

Weekday batch failure

1

9

1

11

Weekend batch failure

1

5

6

12

 

Here mainframe batch jobs fail for batch jobs running on weekdays and also for batch jobs running on the weekend.

 

Future state of Checksheet:

The checksheets have become obsolete and has been replaced by Business Process Management software. The software can handle much of complex issues with rather ease. Data can be quickly presented in a easy to view format. So the value of checksheet seems to be diminished out.

 

From a quality perspective, personally i feel, checksheet remains to be as part of the 7 basic tools of quality. For many small companies, which still may not have the BPM software, checksheet would still the go-to-go place. 

 

Unless an organisation is well equipped with the nuances of the BPM software or any other tool (which is an alternative to Checksheet), it cannot straight-away jump into those new techniques/tools. I sincerely feel that as a result of this, Checksheet should be followed by may be in modified form by focussing on viewing format, easy at which we collect the data.

 

Conclusion:

Checksheet tool is one of the key seven tools of basic of quality tools. With it, we would be able to provide correct data to the processes.Even if it is obsolete, it can be still used by companies which cannot afford to buy advanced BPM software or tools ; or startup companies which are having staff without exposure to BPM / tools and hence they would want to experiment with checksheets to get a feel of things and then work on the tools later on. Hence Checksheet availability is still a must for people to work with.

Edited by R Rajesh
edited alignment

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The best way to correctly understand the evolution of Quality tools is through an analogy with a process, the results from which all of us have benefited, are benefiting and will benefit - Cooking.

 

Once upon a time, a most important part of cooking was to prepare the spices (Masala) that was the very life of the dish. The process of dry roasting raw materials, crushing and grinding them, mixing them in the correct proportion was a difficult skill to master and needed specialized training and practice to achieve reasonable proficiency at it. However as time went on, lean principles were applied and after it was realized that spice preparation was not quite as core a process as the cooking itself, it was outsourced. Now, the cook has multiple options and brands of spices to choose from and neither is the value-add of the spice to the dish diminished due to outsourcing nor are the performance KPIs of the output adversely impacted due to outsourcing. The process of cooking has been effectively deskilled with the result that more people are able to do an effective job of it.

 

Similar to the above, all Quality tools go through a process of evolution to become even better albeit in different forms. The "Check sheet" tool may not be explicitly used nowadays as it was in the past but the principles behind check sheeting that give valuable data which are the life of any structured improvement approaches still remain relevant. On the contrary, it is because "Check sheet" is such an essential, inseparable part of data collection, has it been automated.

 

On the Quality education side, one good way to have trainees or students understand tools and methodologies better, would be to explain them from first principles in a brief manner. Therefore, explaining the concept of Check sheet would continue to be a part of Quality Education. It need not continue to be an independent tool, but will be an essential part of an integrated, automated data collection "Tool" perhaps along with Stratification. 

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The check sheet is a form (document) used to collect data in real time at the location where the data is generated. The data it captures can be quantitative or qualitative.

Today, a Strong Food Safety Management System is essential in the food industry. Hence processes and procedures are documented, monitored and recorded to provide evidence of compliance with the highest standards. It goes without saying that The potential cost of food safety breaches to restaurants is enormous. Not only do they face prosecution if standards are not met, but the reputational damage can mean that even when any problems are solved, customers won’t return, hitting revenues and putting the entire future of the business at risk. For larger restaurant groups outbreaks of food poisoning caused by poor safety can cause share prices to plunge, never to recover.

Most of the Quick Service  Restaurants rely on paper based checklists/ Checksheets, which brings the following major issues/ Disadvantages:

1)      Best Practices are not enforced- The staff just follows the checkpoint son what needs to be done and many times do not understand the standard of expectation and takes multiple followups to enforce best practices.

2)      Productivity is not hampered-  Inspecting and analysing completed checklists takes valuable management time and lot of space is occupied with paper files- bad utilization of expensive real estate

3)      Not dependable many a times- This is a common experience that due to common “Human” traits, In a busy kitchen, tasks/checks which are considered “not important” may be forgotten or left until later, and paperwork can be doctored to cover up slips in food safety management processes. Occasionally records are not even completed until just before the environmental health inspector calls – hardly enforcing best practice.

4)      No live update of situation- No real time alert: An problem may occur during the checksheet The time taken to analyse and conclude on the Checklist by itself may supersede  the real time of the problem that may have occurred- If there is a problem managers may not know until much later, leading to issues worsening in the interim.

5)      Data is not utilized to fullest- This is particularly an issue for larger chains with multiple branches – regional managers have no way of knowing what is happening on the ground, in real-time. It takes lot of time to take decisions that could have made a lot of difference if made in real time.

The answer is to digitise these paper-based checklists and use technology to make the whole food safety management process simpler, more efficient and linked more closely to the needs of the business. By using a combination of handheld devices, sensors and temperature probes all readings can be automatically timestamped so you can see when they were taken, and by whom. More importantly digital checklists can be made interactive, guiding staff through the process of taking a measurement, and most importantly what steps to take if an issue arises. This ensures compliance and provides businesses with an automatic set of digital records that can be easily shared with environmental health officers. As all this data is collected and shared in real-time, issues are spotted early and can be dealt with before they potentially escalate into something worse.

ADVANTAGES of Digitization

Digital Checksheets delivers five main benefits for food businesses, especially Quick Service restaurants, wherever they are in the supply chain:

1. Ensures compliance
 Digitising HACCP checks means that there is a time stamped, tamper-proof record of who carried out the check, and when it was done, helping to inculcate responsibility and accountability in the people to reassure  that the highest standards of quality are being met.

2. Increases productivity
As the range and frequency of checks increase, the amount of time spent taking readings manually and then entering them into computers grows exponentially. While this is necessary, it is time that could otherwise be used for food production or serving customers, so impacts productivity. Managers need to review reams of paperwork, again adding to their workloads. Digitising the process frees time across the board. Also there is lesser inventory of papaers and files- Everything on the cloud.

3. Gives early warning of potential issues (Kanban & Paka Yoke)
Digitising checksheets, particularly when using automated monitoring sensors, can also give vital early warnings of problems – before they turn into major issues. For example, if you manually take temperature readings on a production line at the beginning and end of the shift, you have no guarantee that it remains within the correct parameters for the majority of the shift. Taking real-time readings that are continually updated can show when temperatures are moving up (or down) towards dangerous levels, alerting staff and allowing corrective action to be taken before quality or compliance is affected.

4. Real-time access and control
Food companies can be large and spread across more than one site. This makes managing multiple production lines difficult, as you have to be on the ground to see what is happening. Digitising HACCP readings, and sharing the results securely in the cloud means that they can be easily accessed by Regional / Cluster/ site managers, wherever they are. This provides them with a complete picture of what is going on, and allows them to monitor activities and take corrective action without needing to visit a site.

5. Easy access to records and analysis
Paper-based records pile up quickly, requiring plenty of space for storage. They can also easily be lost, damaged or simply be illegible when you come to review them. Putting them into the cloud removes all of these issues. Data for specific shifts and production lines can be accessed at the touch of a button, giving greater control and making it easy to demonstrate compliance to customers and regulators. Most of the BPMs available in the market helps with data analytics also.

Good record-keeping is a crucial part of successful QSRs, especially large chains. By moving to digital technology, companies can ensure they improve HACCP compliance, QC, increase productivity and take back real-time control, across all their operations.

In the coming times, the shift from Paper work  and manual check sheets  in its original form to a modified version on a technological platform is inevitable.

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Check sheet and its relevance in BPM world

 

The check sheet is one of the seven basic tools of quality control . It is a simple document that is used for collecting data in real time and at the location where the data is generated. The document is typically a blank form that is designed for the quick, easy, and efficient recording of the desired information, which can be either quantitative or qualitative. A defining characteristic of a check sheet is that data is recorded by making checks (marks) on it. A typical check sheet is divided into regions, and marks made in different regions have different significance. Data is read by observing the location and number of marks on the sheet. The Check Sheet is not just one of the seven QC Tools, but it’s also one of the primary tools used during the Measure Phase of a Six Sigma DMAIC Cycle to collect data. Five basic types of check sheets include: 1. Classification Check sheet, 2. Defect Location Check sheet, 3. Frequency Check sheet, 4. Measurement scale check sheet and 5. Check list.

 

Different check sheets:

1.  Classification-Check-sheet1.png.4a2285b20d162404772d08c2f3833dc5.png 

 2. 59d4f5d66d2d3_defectlocation.gif.e18410c6a9a8709fbafef306d758f471.gif 

3.  Check-Sheet-table.png.6273c7b2aba60ff2ba7c9848cbdb82c2.png 

4.  Measurement-Check-Sheet.png.631bf082f8c4faf99811538b77197e78.png 

5. QC-G3.jpg.d2950e332e6553069233dca837e799c3.jpg

 

Using a check sheet is appropriate when the data can be observed and collected repeatedly by either the same person or at the same location. It is also an effective tool when collecting data on frequency and identifying patterns of events, problems, defects, and defect location, and for identifying defect causes.

 

While BPM aims to improve operations by managing the business as a whole, the six sigma set of tools seeks to improve business processes by decreasing variability and defects. Though BPM / tool based approach seeks to implement business process automation, it does not warrant Six Sigma approach & BPM to be mutually exclusive. Six Sigma and Business Process Management principles can be used together until teams find the optimal mix of methods that produce the desired results. To that extent check sheet plays a crucial role.

As a quality control concept, check sheet is very much there as a logical premise of new era BPM tools. In real world practice where automated BPM tools are not fully implementable ( e.g. small scale manufacturing units, real estate construction quality checks, small and medium scale service  /hospitality industry ), Quality Managers still use check sheet as an effective tool- either in its basic form as an A4 sheet or a little advanced excel /tally based templates. While BPM uses sophisticated advanced tools for automated data collection, data analysis and issue identification; the basic check sheet remains as the backend concept. In quality education, concept of check sheet will surely remain, in its original form to start with, and in modified forms in terms of its application.

 

[image source: http://www.sixsigmadaily.com/ ]

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Dear Participants,

 

Firstly, it’s a pleasure to learn from so many industry experts under the BSS roof about their varied experience and diverse views on an interesting topic. Kudos to everyone for sharing such enlightening aspects.

 

I must make a mention of some brilliant comments with regards to their views on both checksheets and BPM interventions.  Mohan draws a wonderful analogy from spices preparation at home vs. outsourcing the same. Rajesh Chakrabarty lists down the advantages and disadvantages of digitization in the simplest way. Sandhya brings out the difference between a checksheet and a checklist adeptly. 

 

Additionally some great arguments by Sabyasachi,  Kiran, and Arunesh.

 

The one that I found quite intriguing and more structured argument, for and against Checksheets is by R Rajesh. He lists down the what, how of a checksheet, future state and then logically defends his argument in his conclusion. The post is here

 

Thank you all for sharing your thoughts.

 

Best wishes,
Tina Arora

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Checksheets in their original form might not hold good anymore - as you rightly mentioned, there are multiple tools and systems to do this activity. however, it is important for a quality leader to understand the importance of the same and the concept. the idea is to collect data and identify the place where people need to pay attention - it could be positive (What part of the website do people like / visit the most) or negative (what is the color that people seem to hate the most). As a quality leader, it is important to understand the current technology and use the same to capture the data relevant to the activity. It is also important to know why the data is being captured and what we intend to do with the data. Without this, capturing anything (manually or systemically) would not help. Understanding the underlying concept is key.

An example - In recruitment - we could get the system to capture the data of age group vs towns who have applied for jobs with us - this would help us identify the right messaging for the particular town to ensure that we get the right hires

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I will try to answer this question in 2 parts :

Part 1 : Checksheets in their original form are almost obsolete.

The Utilization of Cheksheets might have gone out of fashion. However, I still notice that Checksheets are often utilized in Operations where : 1) The Work Nature is repetitive and thereby a Checksheet ensures better compliance 2) The Operator role does not require a Higher level of Education Qualification, thereby the Checklist becomes the easiest tool to relate to and be utilized for gain.

I Have seen it being used in Malls & Restaurants in the Restrooms, capturing the series of activities - timing & repetition in form of  time stamps. It also is used as a Audit Document in some basic roles, thereby serving 2 purposes: Job being done / Audit trail left behind for documentation. In Hotels, the Supervisor uses the Checklist to verify the Quality of Room making, perform Cleanliness audits etc. The Kitchen Support resource places the Checklists for the other personnel to update day to day Breakage and so on…For that matter, even when you visit a Service Centre(2 wheeler/ 4 wheeler), the service personnel use a Checklist to ensure all detail is well captured/noted/recorded.

 

Part 2 :  Do you think it will be removed completely as a QC topic in education of quality or do you think it will continue in its original form or in a modified form? 

I do not think Checksheet will ever be “completely” removed. As long as the contribution of “Maximum Employees” matter, educating them on Checklists will matter.:D

 

Simple Solutions to complex problems being the mantra adopted for robust solutions, Checksheets will have a role to play, predominantly in sustaining Excellence & unearthing gaps in an established process/business.

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With the advent of technology and automation I believe that check sheets will get replaced by consistent, efficient ways to assess and record quality metrics in operations and drive process and quality improvements. Explaining the concept and underlying principle of the check sheet will still remain while imparting knowledge about quality tools but its usage on the production floor or shop floor is certainly undergoing a change.

 

Checksheet is widely in practice even now, and there are 5 Basic types of Check Sheets:

  1. Classification: A trait such as a defect or failure mode must be classified into a category.
  2. Location: The physical location of a trait is indicated on a picture of a part or item being evaluated.
  3. Frequency: The presence or absence of a trait or combination of traits is indicated. Also number of occurrences of a trait on a part can be indicated.
  4. Measurement Scale: A measurement scale is divided into intervals, and measurements are indicated by checking an appropriate interval.
  5. Check List: The items to be performed for a task are listed so that, as each is accomplished, it can be indicated as having been completed.

 Coming to the future state I think this is how checksheet would feature in the cognitive BPM tool:

 

1)      A solution that will guide through the process of defining a measurement template with value fields as well as the question set and the proper sampling method.

2)      In response to a process trigger, it prepares a check sheet from the measurement template and calculates the required sample size.

3)      User then completes the check sheet, noting whether the findings are accepted or rejected and whether the check sheet is complete.

4)      User can retain quality samples for analysis and reporting, and can also specify follow-up actions depending on the results.

This solution will go beyond momentary quality assessments in a variety of situations, helping to pursue steady quality improvements in business activities.

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Checksheet as a base concept may not be removed from the quality education as such. It is a basic mechanism of tracking system performance at the source. So it will retain its existence. Since for any analysis basic need is preliminary data, which is provided by the checksheet concept, it will hold ground as basic need. To make sure that the initial discussion done about a problem is not qualitative but factual checksheet provides a base. Checksheet as a concept will continue to work handy in many areas where on the floor observations matter, like taking note of car condition before it is taken in for service. Keeping check of machine condition on floor and so on.

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Checksheet is a real time document where data is collected at the location where it is generated . 

In all sectors checksheet appears to be a valuable tool for data collection and recording which also helps in back tracing or traceability. 

Checksheets are made as per the process parameters and requirements. It contains a list of checkpoints which needs to be checked in real time and that particular data to be recorded in the checksheet.

 

Now if we compare the applicability of checksheet from past to present days, we can see that a lot of checksheets has started becoming obsolete. As the technology is advancing no. Of checkpoints in the sheets are also increasing. There is always a chance of by-passing the checkpoints by the respective operators. This type of activities are very dangerous if those unchecked checkpoints are related to criticle process in aviation, automotives, or healthcare. 

So checksheet if followed in a proper way is very good tool for detection of failure. 

To make the process more secured and less human dependency mistake proofing or POKA YOKE implementation has started.

Because of this acrivity no. Of checksheets has been reduced.

 

Use of checksheet can be minimised to some extent but it will never become obsolete tool.

It is required to validate no. Of checkpoints in every process. The validation will be done with the help od checksheets only.

In current scenario checksheets are no longer a hard copy of data collection. It is now converted into checking software or a soft copy.

So it can be said as the origin of checksheet is same but the applicability has changed in present condition.

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In today’s fascinating world any idea/tool that appears smart, efficient and technological driven will definitely have edge over the other. However, when it comes to Checksheet in the world of quality and process improvement – it still holds a good place but not in the original form.

 

Almost all service industry has their own customized tracking sheet or a tool to capture the transactions / requests completed for the day. I see these trackers and tools as a modified form of Checksheet, which is simple to use and gives us the more benefit than a Checksheet. Hence, Checksheet exist and will exist in the future but in a more refined and modified form.

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It will be continue in its original form or modified form because it is a structured, prepared form for collecting and analysing data. This is a generic tool that can be adapted for a wide variety of purposes. It is also called a defect concentration diagram. On the other hand when the information is collected is quantitative in nature the checksheet can also be called as tally sheet.the document is typically a blank form that is designed for the quick, easy & efficient recording of the desired information. It is used to observe an operation, process variability, identify potential problem & confirm the effects of problem.

Checksheets are special types of forms for data collection. They make it easier to collect data, tends to make data collection effort more accurate & they automatically produce some sort of data summarization which is often very effective for quick analysis. The form of the checksheet is individualized for each situation.

Another reason for continuation of checksheet is the simple design of the checksheet. This is of two reasons. Firstly it was meant to be a tool for data recording which itself is a quite simple. Secondly the checksheet was meant to be used by the people on the shop floor on actually it would not be very intelligent to expect them to be able to deal with complexity. Hence there is an inherent need for designing the checksheet the way it is.

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A checksheet is a standardised, structured document used to capture data in real time at the location where it is generated. It is typically a form which is given to people nominated to collect data so that data can be captured uniformly without any ambiguity so that it can be used for analysis at a later date. Concept of check sheet was suggested by Dr. Kauru Ishikawa. It is different from a Check list. Therefore checklist  and checksheet should not be confused.

 

Data is generally captured in the form of markings done on a blank sheet. For example:

LOCATION PLOT OR                               CONCENTRATION PLOTreference : http://syque.com/quality_tools/tools/tools27....

While designing a checksheet we need to be first understand what data needs to be collected and at what stage does it need to be collected. Secondly it should be easy to use and thirdly the data collected should make it easy for analysis.

 

Coming to the real question whether checksheet would remain relevant in this era where automation is creeping-in in every walk of our life, there is no wonder that data collection is also automated. Eliminating human intervention in data collection definitely helps to improve the authenticity and the overall quality of data. Therefore checksheets in physical form may become obsolete in this automation era. 

 

However, it is very important for everyone to understand the concept and therefore it should continue as a topic in quality education programs. I would like to emphasize here that it is not the concept that is obsolete and is still very much valid. Therefore the young population needs to be taught about it. Only the manner in which the concept is implemented in changing with time.  

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To imagine that the concept of checksheet would be removed from the study of QC tools is like imagining that manual addition and multiplication would be removed from the syllabus in primary school because calculators and computers have become so common!

Of course, the pen and paper will give way to electronic data capture means, like in most walks of life, and the new mechanism might not even involve check marks, but a serious student of statistical quality control would do very well to understand the different types of checksheets and their purpose with a view to bringing in innovation in how the data can be obtained more efficiently and with better accuracy.

The new age checksheet might be an app in a mobile device and the check mark might be a tap on the screen in a designated area. This will also eliminate the time taken to process the data manually, as well as computational errors. Or it could be an automated robot inspecting a sample, recording various measurements and noting down those which are outside the acceptable range, by means of a message to a central server. Or it could be a scanner device scanning samples as they pass on a belt in front of it, recording the bar codes as well as all measures of interest in a fraction of a second. Needless to say, the data will be streamed to a server for processing. In such a scenario, we might end up collecting a lot of continuous data, which can be used as is or converted to discrete form as a checksheet would do.

 

The concept of checksheet will continue to be relevant but the manner in which it is implemented will test the frontiers of human imagination!!

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The check sheet is a structured form (document) used to collect and analyse data in real time at the location where the data is generated. This is typically a blank form that is designed for the quick, easy, and efficient recording of the desired information, which can be either quantitative or qualitative. When the information is quantitative, the check sheet is sometimes called a tally sheet or a defect concentration diagram. This is a generic tool that can be adapted for a wide variety of purposes. The check sheet is one of Seven Basic Tools of Quality Control others being:

  • Cause-and-effect diagram (also known as the "fishbone" or Ishikawa diagram)
  • Control chart
  • Histogram
  • Pareto chart
  • Scatter diagram
  • Stratification (alternately, flow chart or run chart)

A defining characteristic of a check sheet is that data is recorded by making marks (“checks”) on it. A typical check sheet is divided into regions, and marks made in different regions have different significance. Data is read by observing the location and number of marks on the sheet.

Commonly used check sheets are tabular check sheets or tally sheets, location check sheets and graphical or distribution check sheets.

People sometimes confuse a check sheet with a check list. The list we use for groceries and the report you get from the auto repair shop with things checked off after service (oil, filter, tire pressure, tread, etc.) are examples of a check list. Check list is just a tool used to ensure all important steps or actions have been taken.

There are some disadvantages in using a check sheet. It does not reveal changes to data over time and it does not have data checks. Also there is always possibility of misinterpretation of data due to the presence of several influencing conditions

But inspite of these disadvantages, check sheet is a simple and effective way to display data. It is a first step in understanding the nature of the problem and provides a uniform data collection tool.  It helps distinguish opinions from facts and is useful in the all phases of the Lean Six Sigma DMAIC (define, measure, analyse, improve and control) framework and will continue to be used in times to come albeit with some modifications.


 

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I don't think so the check sheets will be completely removed from QC topic of education as these check sheets can still serve as examples for mistake proofing while working with low skilled workers at the shop floor.

 

Check sheets are used while collecting discrete data and when actual dimensions are not being recorded and instead to know whether the measurement meets the criteria or not is recorded. In case of checking certain features of a product, a check sheet could be used to record whether the dimensions are within or beyond limits by recording ok/not ok.

 

As mentioned earlier check sheets are designed to allow workers with little or no data collection experience to gather data as a regular part of their jobs with little effort and minimal training. Check sheets could reveal causes, patterns and trends even without further analysis of the data, as they are specific to each process, they could take any shape, size and format that facilitates data collection.

 

The check sheets help in calculating the sigma level at the end of operations in a dynamic way seamlessly by the process owner.

 

Well designed check sheets can be more effectively used during subsequent analysis with tools such as Pareto charts, histograms and run charts.

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Replacing checksheet with BPM and tools is a good idea, however, removing it completely as a QC topic in education of quality would not be possible. 

 

Following are the reason supporting the above statement:

 

1) It is one of the QC tools that helps an individual to understand the data and the basic concepts while running the analysis. 

2) It is cost effective tool

3) It is very useful to help distinguish opinions from facts.

 

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A Check sheet is an easy custom designed for quick, easy and efficient recording of desired information which can either be quantitative and qualitative data.

Check sheets are being replaced by modern Business Process Management Software which enables more complex data to be recorded automatically. The process is now neither dependent on human intelligence nor on check sheets.

The data  recorded is arranged in whichever manner required which are ready to use even in graphical format enabling convenience to the users. 

 

 

 

 

 

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Checksheet is a simple, primitive and an effective tool used to record and analyze the data. It primarily captures either distribution or locations of the factors under deliberation. Checksheet precedes the other QC tools used in continuous improvement such as Pareto analysis, Cost analysis, Histograms and Fishbone analysis.

Before the advent of automation, checksheet were used in readiness reviews, time stamps, location plots, measurement and calibrations. Its usage has been incorporated into powerful tools deployed in enterprises and industries. These tools transform the data into appropriate information and prompt solutions for strategic decision making. Here is the contrast of the tool’s feasibility - A Store manager using basic hard checksheet on the flow of the products in the rack when compared to the chain of stores monitoring the trend of a product across the region, group and time substantiates the adaptation of the tool.

Checksheets are here to stay and oblige the user’s need depending on the environment of information, skill set of the individual, resources available, accuracy/swiftness intended and effectiveness realized of the output.

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It is true that advanced Business Process Management Softwares are available that help handling of complex data and Big Data, whereas the Check sheets that we have learnt as part of the seven QC tools were meant for quick handling of data in an organized manner to derive inferences, especially in the shop floor.

 

During the days when the check sheet was originally included as a tool for organizing data, so much of computer power or software were not available. For example, the check sheet with tally marks had the innovative way of grouping the data under a class interval in sets of five that enables easy counting as well as representation of the distribution pattern, which will evolve as the data is collected. In today’s world all this can be easily attained for much larger volumes of data using the computer software such as the BPM tools.

 

However check sheet as a simple and quick way of data gathering will continue to have its relevance, existence and use, considering the fact that the availability of BPM tools may not be there in all situations. Even if available, one may not want to make use of the tools for certain one-off situations.

 

Hence Check sheet will continue to have its place as one of the QC tools. Along with it, the existence of such BPM tools that are capable of handling complex and big data should also be included. I do not think that we have come to a stage where we can declare the check sheet as obsolete yet.

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The check sheet was designed to be very simple. Because it was meant to be a tool for data recording which itself is quite simple and the check sheet was meant to be used by the people on the shop floor. It would not be expected from them to be able to deal with complexity. Hence there was an inherent need for designing the check sheet the way it is.

Check sheets have now become obsolete. They have been replaced by BPM software. This has enables more complex data to be automatically recorded. The process now depends neither of the intelligence of the human nor on the reliability of the check sheet.

Data is now automatically recorder and can be sorted in whatever manner required within few seconds. Many software even produce the data in a ready to use graphical format enabling further convenience for the users.
Other than very rural area where technology can work properly we can replace check list completely

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Considering BPM and its various tools are implemented properly, I think check sheets will be removed from the system.

But for education of quality it should not be ignored completely, because we must have our basics correct. People should understand how those data are coming from BPM tools.

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Check Sheet:

 

Is typical the sheet or a document that contains the headings or factors that are being checked. It is different from a “tick sheet” or “check list”.

 

Even though it is a very old method, it cannot be completely removed from being used. 

There are many areas where there is no other effective tool than the check sheet. Some examples such as to see

how many elderly persons at any particular location are using the public transport Bus for commuting. We could use the check sheet to record the date on a real time at the real location. It is an effective way to collect certain type of data that other methods may not be suitably helpful.

For the above scenario, there may not be a better way than using a check sheet. 

 

In regards to using its original form is necessary or not, I feel the basic idea will remain same but the way that checking is recorded could be changed. 

 

 

 

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The Quality Control check sheet is a document used to collect real time process data from the location of data generation.

Traditionally, QC check-sheets were used to:

  • Check the shape of the probability distribution of a process output
  • Quantify defects by their type
  • Quantify defects by their location
  • Quantify defects by cause (man, machine, material)
  • To keep track of the completion of steps in a multi-step process

 

In high-end automated processes, with the advent of modern technology, many of the activities performed by check-sheets are fulfilled by other means, like:

  • rapid data collection and real time analysis (Real time Statistical Process Control and Statistical Quality Control tools),
  • Inline Nondestructive Testing (NDT) and high end sophisticated imaging technologies for defect identification
  • BPM or Business Process Management tools ensuring steps of a procedural flow are followed in proper sequence

 

But there is a lot of cost involved in implementing these technologies and tools.

 

Also, in operations involving lot of manual steps, it may not be possible to implement some of these technologies and we may still need the traditional QC check-sheets to ensure Quality and identify/capture potential issues. 

 

Even in the case where modern tool are implemented, QC check-sheets may be required for communicating tests/checks for inspections or may be required as a compliance document for regulatory standards.

 

So, In my opinion, QC check-sheets can never be removed completely as a QC topic in education. Their importance and criticality to ensure sustainability of businesses need to be understood and taught, but they would get modified as per changes in their functionality with technological advancements.

 

 

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A Check Sheet is a tool used to systematically collect data on the frequency of an occurrence of defects, patterns and possible causes, ad defected measured by quantitative or qualitative.
Checksheet cannot be eliminated in education of QC. because it is one to the tool to measure quality of the process to improve the process efficiency and effectiveness. so defects needs to be identified.
But these checksheet are losing the original formats from paper sheets to softcopy due to various softwares introduced.

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