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  3. Everyone has provided excellent answers to this question and it was difficult to pick out the best answer. Therefore, all answers have been selected as the best answer. Congratulations to all! Special mention for Ram Kumar Chaudhary as he has given an interesting perspective of visual factory in a service set up.
  4. Q 278. In a perfect world, a manufacturing unit will have an Overall Equipment Effectiveness (OEE) of 100%. What are the components of OEE and why is it not possible to achieve a perfect OEE of 100%? Note for website visitors - Two questions are asked every week on this platform. One on Tuesday and the other on Friday. All questions so far can be seen here - https://www.benchmarksixsigma.com/forum/lean-six-sigma-business-excellence-questions/ Please visit the forum home page at https://www.benchmarksixsigma.com/forum/ to respond to the latest question open till the next Tuesday/ Friday evening 5 PM as per Indian Standard Time. Questions launched on Tuesdays are open till Friday and questions launched on Friday are open till Tuesday. The best answer is always shown at the top among responses and the author finds honorable mention in our Business Excellence dictionary at https://www.benchmarksixsigma.com/forum/business-excellence-dictionary-glossary/ along with the related term
  5. Visual factory , this initiative was first introduced in a book “Visual System “ written by Gwendolyn Galsworth in 1997. It is basically appropriate display of charts , signs , labels and other visual tools which reduce overall complexity of instructions and it can be easily understood by the individual in the plant without reading manuals. Visual factory is one of conveyance mode to facilitate efficient and accurate information to user. In Lean manufacturing ,time and resources spent on conveying data and information are considered as of waste.Visual factory should be used in information which required time and resources on conveying data. Following type of information should be communicated using visual factory Process metrics- it deliver information about current stage of the process e.g. Temperature, pressure Warnings- it wars staff about safety threats in the area. e.g. danger sign on electric panel, Hazardous chemicals. Instructions-It helps staff to remind how to complete a job and which sequence to follow.e.g. Do’s & Don'ts with picture on Machine. General information- Dashboards are common display mechanism which comes under this category. E.g Project update, work site maps. Following are some of the common tools used in a visual factory Kanban Huddle boards Andon Process control charts Gemba walks Floor line marking and signage Source link refereed https://www.visualmitra.com/why-visual-management-is-recognized-as-an-effective-tool-for-performance-improvement/ https://www.visualmitra.com/what-is-the-concept-of-a-visual-factory/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Visual_control
  6. Visual Factory Visual Factory methodology is a concept of lean which means visualizing information on work place where it happening in reality. There is saying which elucidates Visual factory in short “You can control what you can see”. Visual factory is a substantial communication tool. It allows one to know the results even without any word and disruption with work force in work place. Visual factory foremost a momentous role in productivity improvement. The question arrives in mind that how Visual factory leads to productivity improvement and answer lies in a word of Visual. When you see results every hours in visual form it help to challenge work force to move ahead close to target. Also it helps to build a system of completion between different stakeholders from same work place which leads to good productivity level. Visual factory permits individual to visualize the work status and give visibility what can be achieved. What type of information should be communicated using visual factory? As explained above Visual factory is a substantial communication tool. Basically essential information to get from one place to a new place to be transmitted. Information which you needs to communicate on work place requires a brainstorming between cross functional team members and decide what needs to be communicated. Basically you need to first set your goal by decided what you want to achieve. Visual Factory is not limited to only information sharing like any data but it could be used as an indicator which visually explains the status of equipment’s. Few examples to decision making of information using Visual Factory: - Do the brainstorming with cross function while keeping in mind following points. - Targets derived from Department Key performance indicators - Targets derived from individual performance indicators - Specify your goals and organization needs - Anywhere for rapid improvement - Workplace management - Workforce management - Objectives - Equipment efficiency & Status - Safety Measures - Process Measures - Training - Inventory Few examples how to implement information sharing: - following techniques can be quickly adopted to communicate information’s. - Define hourly/daily targets and subsequential achievement - Monthly targets vs achievements - Individual line monitoring - Governance & Routine of individual or a team - Daily/Weekly meetings and their action plan - Defining/display layouts - Display your leaders information - Monthly/quarterly objective achievement status - Simple Visual indicators showing status of equipment’s - Make Visual Process audit results - Work instruction - Training Videos - Floor WIP status (Inventory status of specific batch size) What are some of the common tools used in a visual factory? There are many commonly used tools in a Visual Factory. Visual Factory uses an extensive array of Signs, Charts, labels, Infographics and many more communication tools. 1. 5S (Floor marking, define place of everything) 2. Simply Put (Sign board & Tags) 3. Workplace metrics (Define hourly, daily, monthly target display boards as you need) 4. Andon System (Equipment status.) 5. Kanban System (Material flow)
  7. Visual Factory is a powerful concept from manufacturing with a strong business case for service operations as well (e.g., back office operations where work happens on computing machines/network, in hospitality, hospitals, restaurants, airports). The application areas for visual management across industry sectors are multiple. Let me take example from back office operations and illustrate the point on what information should be communicated and tools used. What type of information should be communicated using visual factory? It will vary from one set up to another in back office depending upon the problem areas we are trying to address or objective which we aim to achieve. However some of the generic dimensions to consider are as below 1. Controllable X's ( Input to the process) : Operations where there is inherently large variation in mix of inputs/quality of inputs/timeliness of input which needs to be governed rigorously. Example : Number of call center rep's available to take calls in any hour; submission of payment batch timely for payment processing, pre-check of documents for loan eligibility before sending for underwriting 2. Output monitoring ( Different characteristic of output) : Operations where there is possibility of remediating the situation and reducing the impact of adverse event/error present a strong case in back office to continuously monitor output. Example : Number of calls getting dropped in a contact center, high value payments revalidation for any fraudulent event 3. Do's/Don't ( Visual/safety aid's for operator's) : Continuous reinforcement of Do's & Don't in process for operators in the process to reduce possibility of error or risk event. Example : List of entities/accounts which needs to be immediately notified if any transaction is observed in those entities which executing day to day process 4. Standard's / Goals : Ongoing communication around the standard's/goals/objectives of the operations to maintain service standards. Example : First time resolution over individual productivity to ensure service representative prioritize resolution of issue versus rushing through the process to close the case 5. Job aids : Day to day job aids for operators to refer while executing their process. Example : Verifications to be while approving a commercial mortgage loan application 6. Uncontrollable X's ( Demand ) : Volumes in a back office operations What are some of the common tools used for visual factory in back office? Principles leveraged : 5 S , Mistake Proofing (Detective control & Preventive control), Statistical Process Control
  8. Visual Factory is a lean concept that emphasizes that need to place critical information right where it is needed. It is a part of lean manufacturing, TQM, TPM by Toyota production system initiatives. This initiative was introduced by Gwendolyn Galsworth in her 1997 book Visual Systems. It is a very effective initiative to improve plant performance and people management. Visual management is the ‘go-getter’ of Lean, the vital ingredient that brings all the effort and expenditure of initiating a Lean programme to a result. The Benefits of Visual Factory is as follows - - Improved roductivity & output - Clear, simplified instructions in complex environments - Safer workplace (given the clear, intentional visual communication) - Higher profits (due to more efficient processes) - Increase employee moral and safety - Fewer errors and less guesswork throughout a work process Visual Factory communicated about the workplace – · VSM – Status of materials and information displayed · Orders – Fulfilled (Green), balance on time (Yellow), Balance delayed (Red) · Material – Good, for rework, scrap identified and isolated · Machine – Running, stopped or under breakdown, its losses · People – Present skills & unavailable skills & precautions taken · Methods – SOPs / Work instructions / specifications to be used Common tools used in a Visual Factory are – 1. Signs 2. Info graphics 3. Icons 4. Labels 5. Floor marking aids 6. Colour lights 7. Cards 8. Communication boards 9. Posters 10. Banners 11. Activity Board 12. Quick changes 13. 5S 14. TPM 15. Standard work 16. Charts and 17. Andons
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  10. Visual factory is a very powerful concept through which we can demonstrate the message which required to visualize everyone in the organization. We can demonstrate information in visual boards like safety parameters trend, Maintenance schedule, Performance of product through Quality-cost & delivery, Shift leader details, Daily production report, SOP's & Work instructions, Production schedules etc. Some of the common tools used for Visual factory are charts, graphs, signs, labels, shadow boards, info graphics, indicator lights, check sheets etc.
  11. The main difference between the two concepts is that ISO 9000 is a shell of requirements used as the basis to develop the entirety of a business' quality management system while Six Sigma is solely a set of tools and methods used to improve specific business processes iso 9001 certification singapore
  12. Vital Keto :- Ça n’a pas dépassé les bornes ? Je suis l’une des autorités les plus respectées dans ce domaine. Il suffit de penser à cela comme si c’est la façon d’aider les concurrents avec des conseils de perte de poids. C’est la façon d’éviter les problèmes de brûleur de graisse. Site officiel (Acheter maintenant):- https://www.thenutracafe.com/fr/vital-keto/ https://www.thenutracafe.com/fr/weeslim-avis/
  13. Q 277. Visual Factory is a lean concept that is used to communicate information in an organization. What type of information should be communicated using visual factory? What are some of the common tools used in a visual factory? Note for website visitors - Two questions are asked every week on this platform. One on Tuesday and the other on Friday. All questions so far can be seen here - https://www.benchmarksixsigma.com/forum/lean-six-sigma-business-excellence-questions/ Please visit the forum home page at https://www.benchmarksixsigma.com/forum/ to respond to the latest question open till the next Tuesday/ Friday evening 5 PM as per Indian Standard Time. Questions launched on Tuesdays are open till Friday and questions launched on Friday are open till Tuesday. The best answer is always shown at the top among responses and the author finds honorable mention in our Business Excellence dictionary at https://www.benchmarksixsigma.com/forum/business-excellence-dictionary-glossary/ along with the related term
  14. There were two parts to this question. Only the first part - What is Nelson rules - has been answered. Do review the answer provided by Mr Venugopal R, Benchmark Six Sigma's in-house expert.
  15. Benchmark Six Sigma Expert View by Venugopal R As early as 1924, Walter Shewhart had introduced what we all know as Control Charts, which has become a very popular and important tool in Statistical Process Control. The Upper Control Limit (UCL) and Lower Control Limit (LCL) represent the +/- 3 sigma limits derived based on the historical data generated from the process itself. So long as the process is in statistical control, the probability of any point falling outside these limits as low as 0.003. Hence any point falling outside the UCL or LCL is suspected as an abnormal occurrence and subjected to analysis to look for any assignable cause(s). Based on the above, it generally implies that so long as the points fall within the control limits, the process is in statistical control and there is no need to suspect any abnormality. In 1984, Lloyd S.Nelson published in the Journal of Quality Technology, that just as we say that the probability of any points falling outside the control limits is very low, there is a possibility for other situations, with equally low probability of occurrence, even though all the points could be within the control limits. Hence, such situations would also be indicative of existence of special causes. He came out with 8 rules for suspecting presence of special causes, of which the Rule-1 is the original case of a point falling outside the Control limits. Each of these rules are illustrated below: While multiple rules are available, it is important to decide which rule needs to be applied when. Rule- is the fundamental one and is hence start with it for any situation. Subsequently, Rules 2 to 4 comprise a good set that help for many of the commonly occurring special causes. For an engineering study, adding rules 5 and 6 will increase the sensitivity to changes in the process average. Rules 7 and 8 will help to identify problems relating to sampling, viz. stratification and mixtures. While this battery of rules is expected by and large to reveal more special causes with higher sensitivity, there are still possibilities of special causes that escape these rules. For example, points may alternate up and down repeatedly, except an adjacent pair of points that may move in the same direction beginning at every nth sub-group. This could mean an underlying special cause that would not get detected by Rule-4. One has to be alert in usage of control charts to detect any patterns that may need attention and at the same time avoiding over-reactions. Reference: Journal of Quality Technology April 1985 edition
  16. Nelson Rules are a method in a process control of determining if some measured variable is out of control. Rules for detecting out of control or non-randomly conditions were first postulated by Walter A. Shewhart in 1920s. The Nelson Rules were first published in October 19848, issue of the Journal of Quality Technology in an article by Lloyd S Nelson. The Nelson Rules are applied to Control chart on which the magnitude of some variable is plotted against time. The Rules are based on mean value and standard deviation of samples. The dashed horizontal line in following illustration represents distances of 1 Sigma and 2 Sigma from centre line. Which Test you should use to detect specific patterns of special-cause variation? Apply certain test based on your knowledge of the process. If it is likely that it might contain particular pattern you can look for them by choosing appropriate test. Adding more test makes the chart more sensitive but may also increase the chance of getting a false signal. When you use several tests together the chance of obtaining a signal for lack of control increases.
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  18. Hi! VK Sir, I am Sourabh currently working in Tourism industry. I had done my green belt certification. Now I am about to start my black belt soon. I am also aspire to become a Lean Practitioner/Lean Guide. How Lean program will help in Tourism Industry. Warm Regards, Sourabh Nandi
  19. Hi, Lloyd S Nelson came up with 8 Nelson rules in the year 1984 addressing variability in a process or data beyond (+/- 3 points standard deviation from the process mean between the sub groups ). These are also called Special causes Variation or Non Random Variation. 8 Nelson rules helps in performing suitable control charts based on the relevant data type covering all the abnormalities in data to help work on assignable special causes & draw RCA & CAPA/Training. Special causes are generally due to sudden change in the process, machine, shifts, customer, Raw Material, Lot type etc. These kind of causes are normally associated to Manufacturing Industry due to unpredictability in nature.
  20. Q 276. Nelson Rules - Generally, a process is said to be stable if none of the observations are outside the control limits. (Calculators for control limits can be seen at https://www.benchmarksixsigma.com/calculators/) However, Nelson rules could help us identify special causes even in such a seemingly stable process. What are these Nelson Rules? Highlight areas / processes where all tests as per Nelson Rules should be carried out. Note for website visitors - Two questions are asked every week on this platform. One on Tuesday and the other on Friday. All questions so far can be seen here - https://www.benchmarksixsigma.com/forum/lean-six-sigma-business-excellence-questions/ Please visit the forum home page at https://www.benchmarksixsigma.com/forum/ to respond to the latest question open till the next Tuesday/ Friday evening 5 PM as per Indian Standard Time. Questions launched on Tuesdays are open till Friday and questions launched on Friday are open till Tuesday. The best answer is always shown at the top among responses and the author finds honorable mention in our Business Excellence dictionary at https://www.benchmarksixsigma.com/forum/business-excellence-dictionary-glossary/ along with the related term
  21. Rajeshwari's answer has highlighted the methods of checking if the goal is achievable and hence has been selected as the best answer. Also review the answer provided by Mr Venugopal R, Benchmark Six Sigma's in-house expert.
  22. SMART abbreviation was first written in 1981 by George Doran, it stands for S- Specific, M-Measurable, A – Achievable, R- Realistic, T – Timely, which guides for goal setting and increase the chances of fulfill project objectives. Setting SMART goals helps to clarify ideas, focus efforts with time and effective resource utilization which resulted in increase our chances of achieving Project goals. In SMART , A stands for Achievable, though at initial phase, causes and solutions are unknown in project but in this phase we should do broad level preliminary study by following points, Is it in principle possible or not? The necessary resources (Time, Budget, Talent) are available or there is a realistic chances of getting it. What have been done and achieved so far, it will help to understand what jump we want to take or step back. Asses limitation with respect to Business point of view. These points will help to define achievable goals, rather then simply define virtually impossible goals. Once we define Achievable goals then later on stage we can do deep dive to identify right root cause and solutions for it by different tools and technique which is quite different than broad level preliminary study.
  23. SMART Every morning comes with a small goal of the life, it may be some to do task for that day, completion of the pending or incomplete activity started yesterday or few days back. Basically all big goals are divided in small goals and as these small goals are completed everyone completes a big Goal. Before forming any Goal it has to be achievable and hence achieved. If not achieved, there could be less inputs put in, inputs may be not in right and specified direction or not in specific way. One more factor is, if Goal is not achievable???? In this case it is all waste, wastage of all activities done, time spent, money spent, morals invested, expectations etc. For that all Goals are always SMART – Specific Measurable Achievable Relevant and Time bound. So it is very essential, Goal has to be ACHIEVABLE! Before we come to know if any Goal – may be improvement in the system for example – reduction in production time of a product, or cost reduction etc, is achievable or not, it is essential to have complete knowledge of the activity. Where from this Knowledge Comes??? Balanced Score Card- It gives us a big picture of the performance of the organization with respect to different metrics decided by the organization. These are the performance indicators which indicate the area organization doing well and the area where need urgent attention as the performance of the organization is always a combined performance of all areas or metrics. Lean- What is Lean Philosophy? Reduction of all sort of wastage, yes in simple language. Where are the waste is most important question everybody ask himself or other. For this there are few tools derived, applied and proven. Value stream mapping – As denoted by the word ‘mapping’ it maps, observes, analyze the complete flow of the activities, processes carried out to produce a product or any required service. SIPOC is the High level map of the processes carried out which gives the connections between the process with respect to Supplier, Input, Process, Output and Customer. In this each and every element is important as it is having its own importance on the performance of the processes and collectively on the manufacturing process as a whole. Typical steps involved are- 1. Document the specific customer requirements. 2. Follow, map each and every process contributing to the complete manufacturing. 3. Collect the data of the processes with respect to – a. Cycle time, b. Available time, c. Set up time, d. Batch Size, e. Quality ( Rejection, defect etc), f. Rework if any g. Number of people working at a station, h. Equipment performance level. i. Number of shifts. 4. Note down all above information along with inventory at each station, 5. The above information will give the relationship between every element. *** Here there comes analysis of each step whether it is Value Adding – for which Customer is willing to pay. Non Value Adding – for which Customer is not going to pay. Goal is to elimination of Non Value adding processes or steps, if not possible complete, reduction in the steps is essential. 1. Brainstorming within the team and elimination of the unwanted steps will give the achievable solution to the problem of waste reduction. 2. 5S is the most encouraging visual tool to give achievable control on inventory of spares. 3. Line balancing will highlight the bottleneck at the process and also how to remove that bottleneck may be by adding more machines or manpower. This also leads to reduction in the excess manpower in the system. 4. SMED approach with eliminating on the job non value activities and converting maximum possible on the job activities to the odd the job will reduce the set up time. 5. Process Performance measure – Is the mathematical tool which gives throughput rate, lead time, Cycle time. These parameter suggest achievable actions to improve them to achieve goal of process efficiency improvement. 6. Simulation is another aspect in which with scientific calculated assumptions and with crystal ball we can fix achievable Goal to improve the process. 7. Hypothesis testing a part of Inferential statistics, is a systematic tool which allows us whether to accept or reject the claim (the goal in question). This is another approach to find achievable goals. 8. Correlation and regression analysis which gives the relationship between two variables. This relationship also can lead to achievable goals by controlling one variable. 9. Pareto Analysis – It also gives relationship between many different inputs and gives major contributors to be controlled. The results of all above activities help us to decide achievable results for the activities in the goal statement. This will help to decide achievable Goal!
  24. Benchmark Six Sigma Expert View by Venugopal R It is believed that the acronym SMART was first used in 1981 by George T Dorain, who worked for Washington Power Company. Since then this acronym has become very popular, accepted widely and also used as guideline for goal setting during the Define phase of a Six Sigma Project. SMART is an excellent tool to guide and focus the thoughts for a team to evolve pragmatic goal for a project. It is true that a project is decided to be taken through the Six Sigma route only if the causes and solutions are not clear. What is clearly known is the problem, which has a business case derived based on its business impact. The very reason to establish a structure like the DMAIC and the associated tools and methodology is to help the leader and team to think in a structured manner to proceed through a path that has many uncertainties and unknown factors. The approval and support for the project team by project sponsor and the leadership is an essential requirement without which a Six Sigma project seldom succeeds. As part of the charter approval, it is important that the Project leader, Sponsor and the Executive Leadership agree that the project is not only important for the business at that point of time, but also that the goal that has been set is considered on consensus as achievable. Since the exact causes nor the solutions are known at that point of time, the criteria for 'achievability' has to be based on several other factors. Ideally the Goal for a Six Sigma project has to be challenging enough to be accomplished with some amount of stretch, but the ‘challenge’ should not be ‘unrealistic’ based on the capabilities and resource availability for the project team. The project goals are usually deployed from the Strategic business goals or from Current Pain points of the organization. If the project goal is deployed from a Strategic Business Goal, then it becomes a critical prerequisite to fulfill the larger business requirement. When the strategic goals are decided, the organization plans for necessary budget, knowledge, technology and other resources. If this planning is done with adequate thought, a good deal of support that is necessary for a deployed project would get built in. Once the project is seen within such a framework by all the concerned stakeholders, judging its 'achievability' becomes more realistic. The involvement of the stakeholders mentioned above is key. On the other hand, if the responsibility of deciding and setting the SMART goals is vested only with the project leader without adequate involvement, review nor support from the other parties, there is risk on the project goal not aligning with the broader business goals and 'achievability' becomes questionable. This is a mistake that happens in many organizations where many Lean Six Sigma projects do not progress successfully. Another important point to be noted is that the “A” in SMART goal cannot be seen without associating with the rest of the alphabets. Often, the project goals start with a broad thought, viz. “Improve Market Share”. Once we make it Specific, we would have to think and stipulate more details such as “Market share for Product A”, “Market share within a certain region” etc. As part of the 'Measurability', the commonly accepted reliable method of measure is established. Although it may be argued that these detailing happen during the Measure phase, the DMAIC phases do not take place as rigid sequence and some back and forth movement is essential. One has to think in totality keeping in mind all the phases, at every stage of the project. We already discussed about the ‘Relevance’ of the project with respect to the overall business goals. The ‘Achievability’ has to be credible within a time period, thus emphasizing the importance of ‘Time Bound’. Other factors that may be considered to judge the ‘Achievability’ of the Goal include: Review the type of the goal – whether it is relating to “compliance gap” or “enhancement related”. If it is a compliance gap for an existing target, compare with past performance trend for same / similar processes. Based on the above, assess the process potential and process capability of the organization to achieve the target. If it is an enhancement kind of target, compare with industry benchmarks and then compare whether the organization is equipped (or has plans to equip) with required capabilities, resources and know-how. Consider the level of the project. Is it a Green Belt or Black Belt? Again, this will also be reflective of experience, capabilities and track record of the team leader and the team members for achieving the set target While a project goes through the Define phase and Measure phase, it is possible that many facts would surface and the level of clarity about the project definition will enhance than what it was when the initial charter was developed. This elevates the confidence level of the team and It is important to revisit the charter and goals, by which the ‘Achievability’ will get re-assessed and the goal may be revised accordingly.
  25. SMART stands for Specific,Measurable,achievable,relevant and timebound. Ideally for any Six sigma projects we just start the project with a problem statement without much information about the root causes and solutions. When we set a project goal this would be based on historical data and we can use statistical ways of arriving at the goal or understand what the customer is looking for in terms of the goal and then evaluate the possibility of meeting the same, we can do this by looking at the process capability, has the team been able to deliver the goal at least once historically then it is definitely an achievable target. Process Entitlement would then help us set up an achievable goal. We can look through different ways to baseline target based on the type of data.. Identify data type if it is discrete or continuous Identify the metric requirement (Larger the better or smaller the better) Check stability and normality for continuous data and for discrete check the stability Set up goal with defined confidence level based on the different tests that would be using which is determined based on step 3 outcome We can also leverage Bench marking data available – Based on the metric and type of industry what is the median or best in class performance for competitors. If the performance is too low we should aim at incremental improvement to median competitor performance and then improve to best in class performance. Now based on where we would want to reach we should look at either process improvement or process redesign
  26. The goal can be considered as achievable when we know of the constraints associated with the success of the goal. So even if the causes and solutions are unknown in the initial stages, outlining the constraints and measures of success can address this dilemma and make the goal "achievable".
  27. In six sigma - DMAIC methodology goals should be SMART – Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Relevant and Time-bound and the goal of the project should be aligned to the issue/problem that we are trying to solve. A in SMART, Referring to - Attainable, Agreed upon, Achievable, Acceptable, Action-oriented Attainable is the important element and needs to be considered thoughtfully. Attaining defect % of less than 1% from 50% might not be possible in the due course of the project with out knowing the causes and the solution path. Below are few questions that can be asked while framing the goal.. Is 50% allowed? Accepted defect%? Cost of Poor Quality? FTR% Control measures in place Frequency of defects? Defect Detection methods? What is the financial Impact? What is the GAP? Actual Versus Desired How to ensure Quality at source (Quality by design, monitoring and control, self check and verification) Based on the response, aggressive but reasonable goals are drafted. One should have clear understanding of the current state (current performance – baseline) and the future state (desirable performance – target), do gap analysis to verify whether it is reasonable/possible while starting the six-sigma project and framing the goal statement. It is not hard and fast rule when it comes to the Goal statement. Entire project charter is a Living Document and can be revised/revisited as we get more clarity while we progress through the phases and during the iteration. To keep from overwhelming, goals should be fine-tuned/broken down into action steps and we should not try to take over the world in one night by setting unachievable goals. Few vital pointers with regards to Goal: • Achievable and Attainable – Practical with the assigned target value • Realistic – with the existing resource and available time • Action-oriented – defined plan of action Specifically Goal should be possible within the defined ability. Take Away: Achieving Goal is far more realistic when being Specific.
  28. Q 275. Project goals have to be SMART and A in it stands for achievable. While the causes and solutions are unknown in initial phases of a Lean Six Sigma project, we expect the goal to be achievable. How can this dilemma be addressed? Note for website visitors - Two questions are asked every week on this platform. One on Tuesday and the other on Friday. All questions so far can be seen here - https://www.benchmarksixsigma.com/forum/lean-six-sigma-business-excellence-questions/ Please visit the forum home page at https://www.benchmarksixsigma.com/forum/ to respond to the latest question open till the next Tuesday/ Friday evening 5 PM as per Indian Standard Time. Questions launched on Tuesdays are open till Friday and questions launched on Friday are open till Tuesday. The best answer is always shown at the top among responses and the author finds honorable mention in our Business Excellence dictionary at https://www.benchmarksixsigma.com/forum/business-excellence-dictionary-glossary/ along with the related term
  29. Interesting answers from everyone, especially the origins of some of the world's most famous brands. The best answer has been provided by Pinkulal Karan. Congratulations. Also review the answer provided by Mr Venugopal R, Benchmark Six Sigma's in-house expert.
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