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Rupinder N

Excellence Ambassador
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Rupinder N last won the day on January 16

Rupinder N had the most liked content!

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About Rupinder N

  • Rank
    Advanced Member

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  • Name
    Rupinder Narang
  • Company
    Benchmark
  • Designation
    Principal Consultant

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  1. Rupinder N

    Validation with Small Samples

    Every sample will give you some information. Wherever possible, change your measurement to variable (continuous) data rather than discrete (attribute). This will enable you to see the shape and form of data in a better manner and hence assess for capability improvement or the lack of it. When one uses continuous data, the risk associated with decision making comes down. Approach based on the objective can be selected carefully - one such approach has been mentioned by our expert Venugopal. Hypothesis testing with carefully selected inputs can also help with validation. For example, do we really need to know whether the breaking strength of a cable has gone up by 1g/sq cm or is it good enough to know that it has gone up by 1kg/sq cm - the latter will need fewer samples. Similarly, what are the values of alpha and beta that can be used to make a reasonable deduction - higher values of alpha and beta need lower samples.
  2. Rupinder N

    Process Controls

    The chosen best answer is that of Prashanth as it lists most often used control methods, though I would change the order slightly: As mentioned by Venugopal, risk studies such a FMEA are the starting point to instituting any controls. Of course, FMEA is also repeated at some frequency and that can be considered as a control, too. I would re-order the list as: 1. Mistake Proofing - Poke Yoke 2. Statistical Process Controls 3. Response and Reaction Plans - this assuming that the error is being detected and corrected before it becomes a defect. 4. Inspection and Audits 5. Process documentation 6. Process Ownership
  3. Rupinder N

    Control Plan

    The chosen best answer is that of Vastupal. Read Hari Shyam's answer for a very succinct overview of how a control plan can be developed.
  4. The chosen best answer is that of R Rajesh for explaining the differences with relevant examples. For simple and effective, straight answer that hits home, read Hari Shyam's response.
  5. Q. 135 Process and Project are terms used in the Business Improvement or Six Sigma world, while the term project is used in the Project Management realm. What are the key differences in a Project and a Process? Can the terms be used interchangeably? Give examples to support your answer. This question is open till 5 PM Indian Standard Time on Friday, 15th February 2019. If your answer is selected as the best answer, your name will be permanently displayed in the World's best business excellence dictionary in the making - https://www.benchmarksixsigma.com/forum/business-excellence-dictionary-glossary/ Please remember, your answer will not be visible immediately on responding. It will be made visible at about 5 PM IST on 15th February 2019, Friday to all 53000+ members. It is okay to research various online sources to learn and formulate your answer but when you submit your answer, make sure that it does not have content that is copied from elsewhere. Plagiarized answers will not be approved. (and therefore will not be displayed)  All Questions so far can be seen here - https://www.benchmarksixsigma.com/forum/lean-six-sigma-business-excellence-questions/ All rewards are mentioned here - https://www.benchmarksixsigma.com/forum/excellence-rewards/
  6. Rupinder N

    Design Risk Analysis

    The various Design Risk Analysis tools that can be used, and may eventually feed into a System, Sub System or Component level DFMEA are listed below: QFD - It provides a logical and structured method of translating the customer expectations (VOC) into design requirements. A QFD cascade model can be used to eventually get to production and quality control inputs as well. This is a great tool to highlight apparent inconsistencies between the customer asks, risks and design requirements. Parameter (P) Diagram - It provides a visual representation of the inputs, parameters and the control factors in a product designed for a certain output. The design of the product should be such that it gives a desirable output, notwithstanding the noise factors. Though, time intensive, this can serve as a great input to DFMEA at System and Sub System Level, and sparingly used at a component level. Function Tree - It shows a preliminary listing of functions and their hierarchy or relation to each other. It helps visually showcase the dependencies amongst the various functions of the systems and can very clearly outline the risks, too. Boundary (Block) Diagram- It is a visual tool that showcases the entire design or system or subsystem complete with the interfaces between various parts. The block diagram can also help identify the boundaries of risk analysis - in scope and out of scope. Failure Mode Avoidance - This structured approach is used in early design phases to identify and detect all failure modes and hence select a design that fails the least (or has the least associated risks) Fault Tree Analysis - It is a deductive failure analysis tool used to predict risks, or potential failures using a hierarchical approach and failure logic - hence it is a combination of probabilities and logic. It is used to uncover root causes for a potential failure by forming a qualitative model. Design Failure Mode and Effect Analysis - All of the above tools can feed into DFMEA at different levels to complete a robust risk analysis.
  7. The chosen best answer is that of Prashanth. He has detailed FMEA, FMECA and the situations under which spending more time and effort on doing FMECA becomes viable. Worth reading is Vastupal's answer, too. Good explanation!
  8. Rupinder N

    Point of Use Inventory

    POUS is a Lean concept that helps reduce the number of intermediate stations or steps between receiving the material and getting it to the work location. Our expert, Venugopal, has mentioned how it may not be so easy to implement POUS. However, it can motivate us to look for vendors that supply good quality material, in the correct lot sizes and at a price that enables us to set up POUS. The chosen best answer is that of Vastupal Vashisth for clear definition and clearly mentioning the wastes that can be reduced. Another must read answer is that of Prashanth Datta. Do think, if POUS also helps reduce "waiting" and how does it work in tandem with 5S to get your mind jogging!
  9. Q. 132 Explain the term Point of Use Inventory as used in Lean Management. How does POUS help reduce classic Lean waste/s. This question is open till 5 PM Indian Standard Time on Tuesday, 5th February 2019. If your answer is selected as the best answer, your name will be permanently displayed in the World's best business excellence dictionary in the making - https://www.benchmarksixsigma.com/forum/business-excellence-dictionary-glossary/ Please remember, your answer will not be visible immediately on responding. It will be made visible at about 5 PM IST on 5th February 2019, Tuesday to all 53000+ members. It is okay to research various online sources to learn and formulate your answer but when you submit your answer, make sure that it does not have content that is copied from elsewhere. Plagiarized answers will not be approved. (and therefore will not be displayed)  All Questions so far can be seen here - https://www.benchmarksixsigma.com/forum/lean-six-sigma-business-excellence-questions/ All rewards are mentioned here - https://www.benchmarksixsigma.com/forum/excellence-rewards/
  10. Q. 131 The basic tenet of the EFQM model (European Foundation for Quality Management) is Bench-marking. Explain the 8 core values of the EFQM Model. Compare the RADAR cycle (EFQM Model) to DMAIC (Six Sigma). This question is open till 5 PM Indian Standard Time on Friday, 1st February 2019. If your answer is selected as the best answer, your name will be permanently displayed in the World's best business excellence dictionary in the making - https://www.benchmarksixsigma.com/forum/business-excellence-dictionary-glossary/ Please remember, your answer will not be visible immediately on responding. It will be made visible at about 5 PM IST on 1st February 2019, Friday to all 53000+ members. It is okay to research various online sources to learn and formulate your answer but when you submit your answer, make sure that it does not have content that is copied from elsewhere. Plagiarized answers will not be approved. (and therefore will not be displayed)  All Questions so far can be seen here - https://www.benchmarksixsigma.com/forum/lean-six-sigma-business-excellence-questions/ All rewards are mentioned here - https://www.benchmarksixsigma.com/forum/excellence-rewards/
  11. Rupinder N

    Y=f(X)

    Prashanth Dutta's answer is the best answer as it is the most relevant response to the question asking for all tools that can be used to list the 'possible causes' or inputs. Please keep in mind to read the question carefully and digress as little as possible. Other background details are also not required as your phrase your answer.
  12. Rupinder N

    SWAG

    The chosen best answer is that of Prashanth Datta. He clearly outlines what the term means, situations under which an educated guess or SWAG is made, and provides examples of situations when it can be used and caution on when it must not be used. Please also read the expert view given by Venugopal R.
  13. Rupinder N

    Time Series Analysis

    Time series will not be of help if we have very few data points (say less than 50) or if the time intervals are not regular. It can also not be used where the environment is so dynamic that it cannot be uncovered and built into the model basis the existing data. The best answer is that of Himanshu Singh as this is the only answer that highlights an example of when one may or may not use time-series. Vastupal outlines the details around time series while Manjeet and Prashant mention specifically when it may not be used.
  14. Rupinder N

    Nominal Conditions

    Vastupal Vashisth has mentioned the two requirements for setting up nominal conditions and provided a clear example, and hence is the chosen best answer.
  15. Rupinder N

    Stable vs Capable Process

    A stable and capable process can be rendered incapable "suddenly" if there is a shift or change in the specification limits. The chosen best answer is that of Manjeet as he provides two such examples. Devesh has also listed an example. Read through rest of the answers for a very concise review of capability and stability concept.
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